Angebote zu "Abdomen" (8 Treffer)

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Collistar Körperpflege Special Perfect Body Int...
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41,95 € *
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Mit dem Intensive Abdomen and Hip Treatment Night von Collistar ist eine hautstraffende Schönheitspflege im Schlaf möglich. Der Wirkstoffkomplex der Körpercreme wurde speziell dafür entwickelt, den körpereigenen Metabolismus zu unterstützen, der während des Schlafens besonders aktiv ist. Fettgewebe wird in dieser Zeit umgebaut, Flüssigkeitsansammlungen können reduziert werden. Durch diese Stoffwechseltätigkeit festigt sich das Körpergewebe und der Orangenhauteffekt nimmt ab. Intensive Abdomen and Hip Treatment Night - spezielle Pflege für straffere Haut Das Kosmetikunternehmen Collistar nutzt aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse und wertvolle Pflanzenwirkstoffe, um möglichst effektive Pflegeprodukte zu entwickeln. Die Serie Special Perfect Body ist der Hautpflege an Problemzonen gewidmet. Unerwünschte Fältchen, Dehnungsstreifen oder Cellulite werden gemildert, die natürliche Regeneration der Hautschichten gefördert. Zusätzliche Pflegesubstanzen beruhigen und glätten die Haut. Das Ergebnis regelmäßiger Anwendung ist ein strafferes, frischeres Erscheinungsbild.Als Teil der Special-Perfect-Body-Serie von Collistar ist das Intensive Abdomen and Hip Treatment Night insbesondere für die Pflege der Hautpartien an Bauch und Hüften gedacht. An diesen Stellen ist besonders häufig eine Straffung und festere Haut gewünscht. Für die Wirkweise der Spezialpflege sind vor allem die Stammzellen des Sonnenhuts sowie Rotalgenextrakte verantwortlich. Die intensive Pflegecreme wird abends auf die gewünschten Hautpartien aufgetragen und sanft einmassiert.

Anbieter: parfumdreams
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The valley elderberry longhorn beetle, Desmocerus californicus dimorphus, is a subspecies of longhorn beetle native to the riparian forests of the Central Valley of California from Redding to Bakersfield. It is listed as a Federally Threatened Species, although it is likely to be removed from the endangered species list. Valley elderberry longhorn beetles (Desmocerus californicus dimorphus) are stout-bodied. Males range in length from about 1.25 2.5 cm ( 1 in, measured from the front of the head to the end of the abdomen) with antennae about as long as their bodies. Females are slightly more robust than males, measuring about 1.9 2.5 cm ( 1 in), with somewhat shorter antennae. Adult males have red-orange elytra (wing covers) with four elongate spots. The red-orange fades to yellow on some museum specimens. Adult females have dark colored elytra.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Chelicerata
79,00 € *
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The subphylum (or phylum) Chelicerata constitutes one of the major subdivisions of the phylum (or superphylum) Arthropoda, and includes horseshoe crabs, scorpions, spiders and mites. They originated as marine animals, possibly in the Cambrian period, but the first confirmed chelicerate fossils, eurypterids, date from 445 million years ago in the Late Ordovician period. Although only four marine species survive, all of them horseshoe crabs (according to the view that excludes the Pycnogonida, all of which are aquatic), there are over 77,000 well-identified species of air-breathing chelicerates, and there may be about 500,000 unidentified species. Like all arthropods, chelicerates have segmented bodies with jointed limbs, all covered in a cuticle made of chitin and proteins. The chelicerate bauplan consists of two tagmata, the cephalothorax and abdomen, except that mites have no visible division between these sections. The chelicerae that give the group its name are the only appendages that appear before the mouth, and in most sub-groups are modest pincers used in feeding, however spiders' chelicerae form fangs that most species use to inject venom into their prey.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Cultures of the Abdomen
141,00 CHF *
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We live in a world obsessed with abdomens. Whether we call it the belly, tummy, or stomach, we take this area of the body for granted as an object of our gaze, the subject of our obsessions, and the location of deeply felt desires. Diet, nutrition, and exercise all play critical roles in the development of our body images and thus our sense of self, not least because how we are made to feel about bodies (both our own and those of others) is often grounded in dietary and lifestyle choices. Cultures of the Abdomen traces the history of social, cultural, and medical ideas about the stomach and related organs since the seventeenth century, and demonstrates that a focused study of the abdomen is necessary for understanding the deep historical meanings that underscore our contemporary obsessions with hunger, diet, fat, indigestion, and excretion. It locates that history from dietary ideals in early modern Europe to the vexing issue of American fat in the twenty-first century, surveying along the way developments in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and Russia.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Eating Disorders in Males
15,90 CHF *
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Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Atlantic International University, language: English, abstract: It is generally accepted that eating disorders are a serious concern among women but we are faced with a severe lack of research into the prevalence of men struggling with their body image. Sadly, many doctors still do not recognize cases of eating disorders in men with the result that fewer than 5% of all referrals to specialist eating disorder clinics are male (Morgan: 2008). Pollack (1999) discovered that at Harvard Medical School, there is increasing evidence that many men (and probably boys too) are becoming increasingly obsessed with their bodies. Men are beginning to diet in unprecedented numbers with an estimated one million of them suffering from eating disorders (Luciano: 2002). This figure of one million is perceived to be understated as males with eating disorders are for too often under diagnosed. Andersen et al. (2000) confirms that eating disorders in males has been overlooked and in some treatment centres, the ratio of men to women has changed over the past ten years from almost entirely women to 50:50. In Psychology Today magazine in 1997, an amazing 43%, nearly half of the men in the survey reported that they were dissatisfied with their overall appearance. Of those men surveyed, 63% were dissatisfied with their abdomen, 52% with their weight, 55% with their muscle tone and 38% with their chest (Pope et al: 2000). There does not seem to be a specific age at which men develop eating disorders, with sufferers as young as eight years old and eating disorders usually appearing around 14-25 years of age (B-eat). Children as young as two years old have already developed damaging eating habits, this can lead to eating disorders as the child ages, with 52,17% of eating disorders persisting into adulthood (Sancho et al: 2007). Morgan (2008) explains that eating disorders and body image problems develop slowly and subtly, but once you start to use eating habits and exercise as a means of dealing with distressing emotions, then there may be a problem. In a Brief History of Eating Disorders (2009) we find that after puberty, one million boys and men will have eating disorders; this coupled with Paterson's statement that 'on average, it seems to be approximately six years before men [or boys] will seek help'...

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 04.08.2020
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Cultures of the Abdomen
125,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

We live in a world obsessed with abdomens. Whether we call it the belly, tummy, or stomach, we take this area of the body for granted as an object of our gaze, the subject of our obsessions, and the location of deeply felt desires. Diet, nutrition, and exercise all play critical roles in the development of our body images and thus our sense of self, not least because how we are made to feel about bodies (both our own and those of others) is often grounded in dietary and lifestyle choices. Cultures of the Abdomen traces the history of social, cultural, and medical ideas about the stomach and related organs since the seventeenth century, and demonstrates that a focused study of the abdomen is necessary for understanding the deep historical meanings that underscore our contemporary obsessions with hunger, diet, fat, indigestion, and excretion. It locates that history from dietary ideals in early modern Europe to the vexing issue of American fat in the twenty-first century, surveying along the way developments in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and Russia.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot
Eating Disorders in Males
12,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2010 in the subject Psychology - Clinic and Health Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Atlantic International University, language: English, abstract: It is generally accepted that eating disorders are a serious concern among women but we are faced with a severe lack of research into the prevalence of men struggling with their body image. Sadly, many doctors still do not recognize cases of eating disorders in men with the result that fewer than 5% of all referrals to specialist eating disorder clinics are male (Morgan: 2008). Pollack (1999) discovered that at Harvard Medical School, there is increasing evidence that many men (and probably boys too) are becoming increasingly obsessed with their bodies. Men are beginning to diet in unprecedented numbers with an estimated one million of them suffering from eating disorders (Luciano: 2002). This figure of one million is perceived to be understated as males with eating disorders are for too often under diagnosed. Andersen et al. (2000) confirms that eating disorders in males has been overlooked and in some treatment centres, the ratio of men to women has changed over the past ten years from almost entirely women to 50:50. In Psychology Today magazine in 1997, an amazing 43%, nearly half of the men in the survey reported that they were dissatisfied with their overall appearance. Of those men surveyed, 63% were dissatisfied with their abdomen, 52% with their weight, 55% with their muscle tone and 38% with their chest (Pope et al: 2000). There does not seem to be a specific age at which men develop eating disorders, with sufferers as young as eight years old and eating disorders usually appearing around 14-25 years of age (B-eat). Children as young as two years old have already developed damaging eating habits, this can lead to eating disorders as the child ages, with 52,17% of eating disorders persisting into adulthood (Sancho et al: 2007). Morgan (2008) explains that eating disorders and body image problems develop slowly and subtly, but once you start to use eating habits and exercise as a means of dealing with distressing emotions, then there may be a problem. In a Brief History of Eating Disorders (2009) we find that after puberty, one million boys and men will have eating disorders; this coupled with Paterson's statement that 'on average, it seems to be approximately six years before men [or boys] will seek help'...

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 04.08.2020
Zum Angebot